Indéfini
Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Visit of H.E. Gyan Chandra Acharya

Venue de Gyan Chandra Acharya à Clermont Ferrand Gyan Chandra Acharya is a Under-Secretary-General at the United Nations, and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States

16h30-17h30

Keynote by Gyan Acharya “The most vulnerable countries in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS)” followed by questions and answers with the floor.

Attending: Master and PhD students including auditors of national Economic Management Programme, among whom many LDC citizens.

 

17h30-18h30

Meeting at Ferdi with researchers concerned by LDCs, SIDS, LLDCs, and the mid-term review of the IPoA.

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Visite de Gyan Chandra Acharya à la Ferdi et au Cerdi

Venue de Gyan Chandra Acharya à Clermont Ferrand Gyan Chandra Acharya est Secrétaire général adjoint aux Nations unies et le Haut représentant pour les pays les moins avancés, les pays en développement sans littoral et les petits États insulaires en développement.

16h30-17h30

Intervention de Gyan Acharya “Les pays les plus vulnérables dans l'agenda 2030 pour le développement durable : les pays les moins avancés (PMA), les pays en développement sans littoral (PDSL) et les petits états insulaires en développement (PEID)” suivie d'un échange avec la salle.

Auditeurs: étudiants en Master, doctorants,  et auditeurs du Programme de formation en Gestion de la Politique Economique (GPE).

 

17h30-18h30

Rencontre à la Ferdi avec les chercheurs  concernés par les PMA, PDSL et PEID, et la revue à mi-parcours du plan d'action d'Istanbul (PAI).

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Présentation du rapport sur la corruption dans les services publics d'Antananarivo

par Frédéric Lesné, Directeur executif intérimaire de Transparency International - Initiative Madagascar

Frédéric Lesné a présenté la méthodologie et les premiers résultats de ses enquêtes auprès des entreprises sur la corruption affectant les services publics d’Antananarivo devant une assistance composée de chercheurs du CERDI et de la Ferdi.

Ce rapport est publié dans le cadre du projet Corruption dans les services publics d’Antananarivo (ou CAPS pour Corruption in Antananarivo’s Public Services) mis en oeuvre par  Transparency International – Initiative Madagascar (TI-IM) en partenariat avec la Ferdi.

L'initiative vise à promouvoir l’adoption de réformes devant contribuer à améliorer la gouvernance et la qualité des services publics de la capitale malgache.

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Présentation du rapport sur la corruption dans les services publics d'Antananarivo

par Frédéric Lesné, Directeur executif intérimaire de Transparency International - Initiative Madagascar

Frédéric Lesné a présenté la méthodologie et les premiers résultats de ses enquêtes auprès des entreprises sur la corruption affectant les services publics d’Antananarivo devant une assistance composée de chercheurs du CERDI et de la Ferdi.

Ce rapport est publié dans le cadre du projet Corruption dans les services publics d’Antananarivo (ou CAPS pour Corruption in Antananarivo’s Public Services) mis en oeuvre par  Transparency International – Initiative Madagascar (TI-IM) en partenariat avec la Ferdi.

L'initiative vise à promouvoir l’adoption de réformes devant contribuer à améliorer la gouvernance et la qualité des services publics de la capitale malgache.

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Disaster Risk Financing and Insurance (DRFI)

Ferdi_Clermont workshop jointly sponsored by the Ferdi, the Cerdi, the World Bank’s Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery with support from the United Kingdom’s Department of International Development.

With accelerating climate change, the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events has been growing rapidly, with increasingly costly consequences on human welfare and productive assets.

This has induced developing countries to search for the definition and implementation of disaster risk financing and insurance (DRFI) strategies to allow them to cope with weather shocks in a rapid, predictable, and cost effective fashion. Putting into place ex-ante financial strategies not only allows governments to better respond to shocks, but also helps firms, communities, and households to better manage risk knowing the initiatives that governments will take in responding to disasters with relief and reconstruction programs. These financial strategies are complex to define because they involve a large number of financial instruments. Ex-ante risk financing instruments include financial reserves and calamity funds, budget contingencies and reallocations, contingent debts and emergency loans, risk transfer mechanisms (that include traditional insurance and re-insurance, index-based insurance, and catastrophic bonds), and the use of emergency taxes and borrowing on the domestic and international markets. These strategies are still in their infancy, with exploration of alternative designs and early impact evaluations of existing schemes. The objectives of the FERDI workshop on DRFI are to:

(1) define country needs for social protection against catastrophic risks,

(2) explore theoretically and actuarially how to combine financial products for risk layering,

(3) assess current progress with the use of probabilistic catastrophic risk modeling in defining financial strategies,

(4) characterize empirically the social and economic consequences of extreme weather shocks and paths of recovery at the national and household levels,

(5) evaluate the impact on growth and welfare of existing DRFI schemes,

and (6) assess progress in research and define priorities for future research efforts on DRFI.

The workshop is jointly sponsored by the Ferdi, the Cerdi and by the World Bank’s Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery with support from the United Kingdom’s Department of International Development.

Thursday June 4 / Jeudi 4 Juin

Introduction : The issue of social protection against catastrophic risks

Chair: Alain de Janvry (UC Berkeley and FERDI)

9.00 – 9.45

Toward the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris and the Ferdi approach
Patrick Guillaumont, Université d’Auvergne et Président de la Ferdi

Disasters and welfare
Emmanuel Skoufias, The World Bank Group

Risk, insurance, and poverty in DFID’s strategic plan
Peter D’Souza, DFID

Session 1: Theory: Financial management of disaster risk

Chair: Francis Ghesquiere (World Bank/GFDRR)

9.45 – 10.30 

Planning for Disasters
Stefan Dercon and Daniel Clarke, DFID and The World Bank Group/GFDRR

10.30 – 10-45 - Coffee Break

10.45 – 12.15

Ex-ante evaluation of the cost of alternative sovereign DRFI strategies
Richard Poulter, The World Bank Group/GFDRR

The cost of post-disaster budget reallocations
Richard Odoom, Crown Agents

12.15 – 13.30     Lunch / Déjeuner: Océania

Session 2: Shocks and recovery: Modeling and Positive Analyses

Chair: Javier Pereira, World Bank Group

13.30 – 15.45

Utility, Risk, and Demand for Incomplete Insurance: Lab Experiments with Guatemalan Coffee producers
Elisabeth Sadoulet (with Craig McIntosh and Felix Povel), UC Berkeley

The application of a probabilistic catastrophe risk modeling framework to poverty outcomes
Catherine Porter, Heriot Watt University

A resilience indicator as a tool to prioritize and assess disaster risk management and financing policies
Stephane Hallegatte, World Bank Group

15.45 – 16.00 - Coffee break

16.00 – 17.30

The fiscal implications of hurricane strikes in the Caribbean
Eric Strobl, Ecole Polytechnique

Long term consequences of short-run income shocks: Evidence from cyclones in Madagascar
Danamona Adrianarimanana, UC Berkeley

19.30 - Ferdi Dinner Invitation

Friday June, 5 / Vendredi 5 Juin

Session 3: Evaluations of SDRFI experiences

Chair: Oscar Ishizawa, The World Bank Group

9.00 – 10.30

Ex ante risk management and implications for poverty
Emmanuel Skoufias and Ruth Hill, World Bank Group

Expanding or increasing : index-based scalable social protection in Niger
Francesca de Nicola, The World Bank Group

10.30 – 10.45 - Coffee break

10.45 – 12.25

Insuring Growth: The Impact of Disaster Funds on Economic Development
Alejandro del Valle, Paris School of Economics, Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet (UC Berkeley and FERDI)

Impact evaluation of CADENA in Mexico
Elizabeth Ramirez, UC Berkeley

12.25 – 13.40 - Lunch / Déjeuner, Océania

Session 4 : The Political economy of protection

Chair: Vianney Dequiedt, Cerdi

13.40 – 15.30 

Voter Response to Natural Disaster Aid
Alan Fuchs, World Bank Group

The political economy of sovereign weather risk protection in Mexico
Laura Boudreau, UC Berkeley and World Bank Group/GFDRR

15.30 –16.30

Round table on priorities for future research

Chair: Emmanuel Skoufias (The World Bank Group)

Speakers:

Francis Ghesquiere, World Bank Group/GFDRR
Peter D’Souza, DFID
Ruth Vargas Hill, The World Bank Group
French Ministry of Finance

16.30-16.45

Lessons learned and future directions

Daniel Clarke, The World Bank Group/GFDRR

 

 

Ex-ante evaluation of the cost of alternative sovereign DRFI strategies

By Daniel Clarke, Richard Poulter, Olivier Mahul, Tse-Ling The, The World Bank Group

 

Utility, Risk, and Demand for Incomplete Insurance: Lab Experiments with Guatemalan Cooperatives
By Craig McIntosh, University of California San Diego, Felix Povel, Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), Frankfurt, and Elisabeth Sadoulet, University of California Berkeley and Ferdi

 

Insuring Growth: The Impact of Disaster Funds on Economic Development

By Alain de Janvry, Elisabeth Sadoulet, University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow Ferdi, and  Alejandro Del Valle, Paris School of Economics

 

The application of a probabilistic catastrophe risk modelling framework to poverty outcomes: General form vulnerability functions relating household poverty outcomes to hazard intensity in Ethiopia

By Catherine Porter, Heriot-Watt University and Emily White, The World Bank Group

 

The Fiscal Implications of Hurricane Strikes in the Caribbean

By B. Ouattara, University of Manchester; E. Strob, Ecole Polytechnique, J. Vermeiren, Kinetic Analysis Corporation, and S. Yearwood, Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility

 

Ex-Ante Risk Management and Implications for Sustainable Poverty Reduction

By Ruth Hill and Emmanuel Skoufias, The World Bank Group

 

The role of inter-household transfers in coping against post-disaster losses in Madagascar

By Danamona Andrianarimanana, UC Berkeley

 

Occupational Diversification as an Adaptation to Rainfall Variability in Rural India

By Emmanuel Skoufias, Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay, Sergio Olivieri, The World Bank group

 

Managing Risk with Insurance and Savings: Experimental Evidence for Male and Female Farm Managers in the Sahel

By Clara Delavallade, IFPRI; Felipe Dizon and Jean Paul Petraud, University of California, Davis; Ruth Vargas Hill, IFPRI and the World Bank

 

Expanding or increasing : index-based scalable social protection in Niger

By Francesca de Nicola, The World Bank Group

 

Weather-indexed insurance and productivity of small-scale farmers: An impact evaluation of Mexico's CADENA program

By Elizabeth Ramirez Ritchie, UC Berkeley

 

Voters Response to Natural Disasters Aid: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Drought Relief Payment in Mexico

By  Alan Fuchs and Lourdes Rodriguez-Chamussy, The World Bank Group

 

Discipline and disasters: The political economy of Mexico’s Sovereign Disaster Risk Financing Program

By Laura Boudreau, University of California – Berkeley and The World Bank

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Commodity market instability and asymmetries in developing countries: Development impacts and policies

Symposium organized by the Ferdi

Symposium organized by the Ferdi with Alexandros Sarris, Professor at the University of Athens and Senior Fellow Ferdi.

Background and motivation

Economic market instability has been at the center of development policy debate in the recent past, starting with the food commodity prices spikes on 2007-8, then continuing with the 2009-10 financial crisis, the ongoing energy market volatility, and the continuing commodity market instability of the last few years. Natural but also economic disasters have left large economic losses. The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Rural Poverty Report of 2011 emphasized the importance of addressing risk for rural development, and the latest World Bank World Development Report of 2014 (WDR) highlighted that there is substantial evidence that recognizing and preparing for risk can pay off in terms of development and growth. The main message of the WDR of 2014 was that individuals and institutions in developing countries as well as donors should move from being “crisis fighters” to becoming “proactive and systematic risk managers”, and this because protecting hard-won development gains by building resilience to risk is essential to achieving prosperity.

Risk, defined as exposure to uncertain future events, is part of everyday life, and people and countries have learned to deal with it over centuries. However, there is a growing realization that uncertainty and risk maybe crucial to a country’s growth and development as well as its welfare. Sudden and unanticipated shocks, whether caused by natural events, or economic developments affect developing countries, as well as poor people in unequal ways.  Commodity market risks in particular are well known to affect development and welfare in a variety of ways and it is important to understand these so as to prioritize policy actions, and to design strategies to avoid the undesirable parts of the consequences. In particular commodity market shocks may have both asymmetric patterns and  asymmetric impacts, namely differing in booms and busts, or create irreversibilities that may hamper subsequent development. While considerable research has taken place in the past to understand the influences of commodity market shocks, asymmetries and irreversibilities have not been studied much. It is to this general topic that the workshop is addressed.

Workshop purpose and themes

The general purpose of the workshop is on the one hand to examine the state of the art in the area of asymmetries and irreversibilities relating to commodity market instability and development, with the purpose to first pinpoint gaps in current research, and secondly to highlight promising areas of policy intervention to aid developing countries to manage/cope with market instability. As the topic is very large, and impossible to cover in all of its various aspects, the workshop will restrict its proceedings to a set of specific themes that are judged to have been underemphasized in previous empirical and policy development economics research. While commodity market instability can originate in many ways, the workshop will be restricted to market instability arising from natural or other unpredicted events, as well as unforeseen market developments.

 

We would like to thank l’Université d’Auvergne, the Cerdi and the Programme “Investissement d’avenir” for their support.

Wednesday June 24 / Mercredi  24 Juin

9.00 – 9.15   

Welcoming remarks, Patrick Guillaumont , Président de la Ferd

 
Session 1 :The setting and problematique

Chair: Will Martin, IFPRI

9.15 – 10.15  

Introduction, background, and purpose of workshop

Commodity market instability and development. Issues and policies, Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Grèce, et Ferdi

Discussion générale

10.15 - 10.30   

Coffee break

 

Session 2: Trends and asymmetries in market instability

Chair: Will Martin, IFPRI

10.30 - 12.15

Evolution of commodity market instability

Evolution and patterns of global commodity market instability, Christopher Gilbert, SAIS Bologna Center, Johns Hopkins University

Asymmetries in commodity price behavior, Atanu Ghoshray, Newcastle University Business School

Discussion: Catherine Simonet, Overseas Development Institute

12.15-13.30

Lunch break

 

Session 3: Afternoon session. Asymmetries and distortions

13.30 – 15.15  

Instability, asymmetries, and market distortions

Trading-off Volatility and Distortions? Food Policy During Price Spikes, Johan Swinnen, University of Leuve

Price transmission and asymmetric adjustment: the case of three West African rice markets, Stéphanie Brunelin, Consultant, Banque mondiale

Discussion: Michiel Keyzer, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

15.15 - 15.30  

Coffee break

15.30 – 17.15  

The nature of market instability in developing countries

On farm storage and asymmetric price shocks, Elodie Maitre D'Hotel, CIRAD Burkina Faso

Food Price Volatility in Landlocked countries, Friederike Greb and George Rapsomanikis, FAO, Rome

Discussion: Catherine Araujo-Bonjean, Cerdi

17.15 - 18.00 

General Discussion

 

Thursday June, 25 / Jeudi 25 Juin

Session 4: Impacts of commodity market instability

Chair: Johan Swinnen, University of Leuven

09.00 - 10.45

Commodity instability and impacts on developing country households

Food prices and household welfare in West Africa: A pseudo panel approach, Zacharias Ziegelhofer, UNECA

Experimental Evidence on Attitudes to Price Uncertainty, Marc Bellemare, University of Minnesota, USA

Discussion: Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, et Ferdi

10.45 - 11.00 

Coffee break

11.00 - 12.45

Commodity market instability and social impacts

Food price shocks-induced poverty traps. Analysis using a panel dataset from Uganda, Adamon Mukasa, University of Trento

Social consequences of market instability: Asymmetry matters, Patrick Guillaumont et Joel Cariolle, Ferdi

Discussion: Sara Savastano, Université de Rome II, Tor Vergatta  

12.45 - 14.00Lunch break

Session 5: Policies addressing commodity market instability

Chair: Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, et Ferdi

14.00–15.40 

Market instability and developing country policies

Price insulation and poverty impacts of market instability, Will Martin, IFPRI

Food Price Volatility in Developing Countries: The role of trade and storage, Lukas Kornher, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn

Discussion: Franck Galtier, CIRAD

Comments on “Price insulation and poverty impacts of market instability” Kym Anderson, Maros Ivanic and Will Martin

15.45 - 16.00

Coffee break

16.00–17.45 

Policy recommendations on commodity market instability and development

Trade policy coordination and food price volatility, Christophe Gouel, INRA, Economie Publique, et CEPII

Consistency between Theory and Practice in Policy Recommendation by International Organizations for Extreme Price and Extreme Volatility Situations, Maximo Torero, IFPRI

17.45–18.15 

Open discussion and lessons learned

18.15 

Closing remarks and end of workshop

 

Interview with Catherine Simonet, Research Officer, ODI

Climat, marché des matières premières, indicateur de vulnérabilité au changement climatique

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Asymétries et instabilité du marché des matières premières dans les pays en développement

Colloque organisé par la Ferdi

Les asymétries et l’instabilité du marché des matières premières dans les pays en développement : politiques et impacts sur le développement

Colloque organisé par la Ferdi autour d'Alexandros Sarris, Professeur à Professeur à l'Université d'Athènes et Senior Fellow Ferdi.

Contexte et motif de l’atelier

Ces dernières années, plusieurs événements tels que la crise de 2007-2008 sur les prix des produits alimentaires, la crise financière de 2009-2010 et la volatilité continue des marchés de l’énergie et des matières premières ont placé la question de l’instabilité économique des marchés au cœur du débat sur les politiques de développement. Les catastrophes naturelles, mais aussi les bouleversements économiques, ont causé d’importantes pertes. Le Rapport 2011 du Fonds international de développement agricole (FIDA) sur la pauvreté rurale souligne l’importance de la question du risque pour le développement rural et le Rapport 2014 de la Banque mondiale sur le développement dans le monde (WDR) indique que les mesures prises pour identifier les risques et s’y préparer peuvent constituer un facteur de développement et de croissance. En résumé, le WDR 2014 observe que les personnes et les institutions des pays en développement, ainsi que les donateurs, doivent passer de la « lutte contre les crises » à une « gestion anticipative et systématique du risque », car, pour atteindre la prospérité, il est essentiel d’accroître la résilience face aux risques et de protéger ainsi les progrès durement acquis dans le processus de développement.

Le risque, en tant que confrontation à un avenir incertain, est un aspect de la vie quotidienne des peuples et des pays qui ont appris à s’en accommoder au fil des siècles. Toutefois, la conscience est grandissante du fait que l’incertitude et le risque peuvent être déterminants dans la croissance, le développement, et au final le bien-être. Qu’ils proviennent de phénomènes naturels ou de transformations économiques, les chocs soudains et imprévus frappent davantage les pays en développement et les populations pauvres. Il a notamment été démontré que les risques associés au marché des matières premières ont de multiples répercussions sur le développement et la prospérité. Il est donc important de bien les appréhender de façon à pouvoir hiérarchiser les mesures politiques et à concevoir des stratégies permettant d’éviter des conséquences indésirables. Plus particulièrement, les chocs qui touchent le marché des matières premières peuvent présenter des scénarios et des impacts asymétriques (autrement dit, des cycles conjoncturels divergents). Ces chocs peuvent aussi avoir des effets irréversibles susceptibles de freiner le développement. Alors que de nombreuses études portent sur les causes des chocs qui affectent le marché des matières premières, les asymétries et les irréversibilités ont en revanche été peu étudiées. Cette question sera le sujet de l’atelier.

Objectif et thèmes de l’atelier

Cet atelier visera tout d’abord à examiner l’état actuel des connaissances sur les asymétries et les irréversibilités relatives à l’instabilité du marché des matières premières et au développement. Il en identifiera ensuite les lacunes et déterminera comment les interventions politiques peuvent aider les pays en développement à gérer l’instabilité des marchés. Le sujet étant très vaste et impossible à aborder dans sa totalité, l’atelier s’en tiendra à un ensemble de thèmes spécifiques jusqu’alors peu étudiés dans les travaux empiriques menés sur l’économie politique du développement. Même si l’instabilité du marché des matières premières peut avoir de multiples causes, l’atelier se limitera à celle provoquée par des phénomènes naturels, des événements imprévisibles ou des évolutions imprévues du marché.

 

Nous remercions l’Université d’Auvergne, le Cerdi et le Programme “Investissement d’avenir” pour leur aide.

 

 

              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday June 24 / Mercredi  24 Juin

8.45 – 9.00 

Accueil des participants

9.00 – 9.15   

Mot de bienvenue, Patrick Guillaumont , Président de la Ferd

 
Session 1 :The setting and problematique

Chair: Will Martin, IFPRI

9.15 – 10.15  

Introduction, background, and purpose of workshop

Commodity market instability and development. Issues and policies, Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Grèce, et Ferdi

Discussion générale

10.15 - 10.30   

Pause café

 

Session 2: Trends and asymmetries in market instability

Chair: Will Martin, IFPRI

10.30 - 12.15

Evolution of commodity market instability

Evolution and patterns of global commodity market instability, Christopher Gilbert, SAIS Bologna Center, Johns Hopkins University

Asymmetries in commodity price behavior, Atanu Ghoshray, Newcastle University Business School

Discussion: Catherine Simonet, Overseas Development Institute

12.15-13.30

Pause déjeuner

 

Session 3: Afternoon session. Asymmetries and distortions

13.30 – 15.15  

Instability, asymmetries, and market distortions

Trading-off Volatility and Distortions? Food Policy During Price Spikes, Johan Swinnen, University of Leuve

Price transmission and asymmetric adjustment: the case of three West African rice markets, Stéphanie Brunelin, Consultant, Banque mondiale

Discussion: Michiel Keyzer, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

15.15 - 15.30  

 Pause café

15.30 – 17.15  

The nature of market instability in developing countries

On farm storage and asymmetric price shocks, Elodie Maitre D'Hotel, CIRAD Burkina Faso

Food Price Volatility in Landlocked countries, Friederike Greb and George Rapsomanikis, FAO, Rome

Discussion: Catherine Araujo-Bonjean, Cerdi

17.15 - 18.00 

General Discussion

 

Thursday June, 25 / Jeudi 25 Juin

Session 4: Impacts of commodity market instability

Chair: Johan Swinnen, University of Leuven

09.00 - 10.45

Commodity instability and impacts on developing country households

Food prices and household welfare in West Africa: A pseudo panel approach, Zacharias Ziegelhofer, UNECA

Experimental Evidence on Attitudes to Price Uncertainty, Marc Bellemare, University of Minnesota, USA

Discussion: Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, et Ferdi

10.45 - 11.00 

Coffee break

11.00 - 12.45

Commodity market instability and social impacts

Food price shocks-induced poverty traps. Analysis using a panel dataset from Uganda, Adamon Mukasa, University of Trento

Social consequences of market instability: Asymmetry matters, Patrick Guillaumont et Joel Cariolle, Ferdi

Discussion: Sara Savastano, Université de Rome II, Tor Vergatta  

12.45 - 14.00Déjeuner

Session 5: Policies addressing commodity market instability

Chair: Alexandros Sarris, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, et Ferdi

14.00–15.40 

Market instability and developing country policies

Price insulation and poverty impacts of market instability, Will Martin, IFPRI

Food Price Volatility in Developing Countries: The role of trade and storage, Lukas Kornher, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn

Discussion: Franck Galtier, CIRAD

Comments on “Price insulation and poverty impacts of market instability” Kym Anderson, Maros Ivanic and Will Martin

15.45 - 16.00

pause café

16.00–17.45 

Policy recommendations on commodity market instability and development

Trade policy coordination and food price volatility, Christophe Gouel, INRA, Economie Publique, et CEPII

Consistency between Theory and Practice in Policy Recommendation by International Organizations for Extreme Price and Extreme Volatility Situations, Maximo Torero, IFPRI

17.45–18.15 

Open discussion and lessons learned

18.15 

Closing remarks and end of workshop

 

3 questions à Alexandros Sarris, Professeur à l'Université d'Athènes et Senior Fellow Ferdi

 
1. Quel est l'objectif de cet atelier?

2. Qu'est ce que l'asymétrie du marché des matières premières? en quoi joue-t-elle sur la croissance?

3. A la suite de cet atelier, vous organisez une conférence sur Paris avec l'OCP Policy Center, un think tank marocain dont l'objectif est d'apporter la perspective d’un pays à revenu intermédiaire africain sur les grands débats internationaux. Quelles seront les thématiques de cet événement?

 

Entretien avec Catherine Simonet, Chargée de recherche chez ODI

Climat, marché des matières premières, indicateur de vulnérabilité au changement climatique

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Financement et Assurance des Risques de Désastres Naturels

Ferdi_Clermont Atelier organisé en partenariat par la Ferdi, le Cerdi, le groupe GFDRR de la Banque mondiale et soutenu par le Département du Développement international du Royaume Uni.

Avec l’accélération du changement climatique, la fréquence et la sévérité des événements climatiques extrêmes se sont accrues rapidement, avec des conséquences de plus en plus coûteuses sur le bien être humain et les actifs de production.

De fait, les pays en développement ont dû rechercher une définition et la mise en œuvre de stratégies de Financement et Assurance des Risques de Désastres Naturels (DRFI) afin de répondre aux chocs climatiques de manière rapide, prévisible et efficace par rapport à leur coût. La mise en place de stratégies financières ex-ante permet non seulement aux gouvernements de mieux répondre aux chocs mais aide également les entreprises et les ménages à mieux gérer les risques dès lors qu’ils connaissent les initiatives gouvernementales, et les programmes de secours et de reconstruction, qui seront mis en oeuvre en réponse aux catastrophes naturelles. Ces stratégies financières sont complexes à définir en raison du nombre important d’instruments financiers. Les instruments ex-ante de financement du risque incluent réserves financières et fonds catastrophe, budgets contingents et réallocations budgétaires, dettes et prêts d’urgence, mécanismes de transfert des risques (incluant les assurances traditionnelles et la réassurance, ainsi que les mécanismes d'assurance indexée liés aux catastrophes), usage de taxes d’urgence et emprunts sur les marchés domestique et international. Ces stratégies en sont encore à leurs balbutiements, avec une exploration de définitions alternatives et les premières évaluations d’impact des schémas existants.

Les objectifs de l’atelier sur le Financement et l’Assurance des Risques de Désastres Naturels (DRFI) sont :

  • de définir les besoins des pays en matière de protection sociale contre les risques de catastrophes
  • d’explorer de manière théorique et actuarielle comment combiner les produits financiers pour répartir les risques
  • d’évaluer les progrès en matière de modélisation des risques de catastrophe servant à la définition de stratégies financières
  • de caractériser de manière empirique les conséquences économiques et sociales des chocs climatiques et les chemins du relèvement observés au niveau national et au  niveau des ménages.
  • évaluer l’impact sur la croissance et le bien-être des schémas existants de DRFI
  • enfin, évaluer les progrès de la recherche et définir les priorités pour la recherche future en matière de DRFI.

Quatre questions à Alain de Janvry, professeur à l'Université de Californie, Berkeley :

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

L’atelier était organisé en partenariat par la Ferdi, le Cerdi, et par le groupe « Facilité mondiale pour la réduction des catastrophes et le relèvement (GFDRR) de la Banque mondiale » et avec le soutien du Département du Développement international du Royaume Uni.

Thursday June 4 / Jeudi 4 Juin

Introduction : The issue of social protection against catastrophic risks

Chair: Alain de Janvry (UC Berkeley and FERDI)

9.00 – 9.45

Toward the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris and the Ferdi approach
Patrick Guillaumont, Université d’Auvergne et Président de la Ferdi

Disasters and welfare
Emmanuel Skoufias, The World Bank Group

Risk, insurance, and poverty in DFID’s strategic plan
Peter D’Souza, DFID

Session 1: Theory: Financial management of disaster risk

Chair: Francis Ghesquiere (World Bank/GFDRR)

9.45 – 10.30   

Planning for Disasters
Stefan Dercon and Daniel Clarke, DFID and The World Bank Group/GFDRR

10.30 – 10-45 - Coffee Break

10.45 – 12.15

Ex-ante evaluation of the cost of alternative sovereign DRFI strategies
Richard Poulter, The World Bank Group/GFDRR

The cost of post-disaster budget reallocations
Richard Odoom, Crown Agents

12.15 – 13.30     Lunch / Déjeuner: Océania

Session 2: Shocks and recovery: Modeling and Positive Analyses

Chair: Javier Pereira, World Bank Group

13.30 – 15.45

Utility, Risk, and Demand for Incomplete Insurance: Lab Experiments with Guatemalan Coffee producers
Elisabeth Sadoulet (with Craig McIntosh and Felix Povel), UC Berkeley

The application of a probabilistic catastrophe risk modeling framework to poverty outcomes
Catherine Porter, Heriot Watt University

A resilience indicator as a tool to prioritize and assess disaster risk management and financing policies
Stephane Hallegatte, World Bank Group

15.45 – 16.00 - Coffee break

16.00 – 17.30

The fiscal implications of hurricane strikes in the Caribbean
Eric Strobl, Ecole Polytechnique

Long term consequences of short-run income shocks: Evidence from cyclones in Madagascar
Danamona Adrianarimanana, UC Berkeley

19.30 - Ferdi Dinner Invitation

Friday June, 5 / Vendredi 5 Juin

Session 3: Evaluations of SDRFI experiences

Chair: Oscar Ishizawa, The World Bank Group

9.00 – 10.30

Ex ante risk management and implications for poverty
Emmanuel Skoufias and Ruth Hill, World Bank Group

Expanding or increasing : index-based scalable social protection in Niger
Francesca de Nicola, The World Bank Group

10.30 – 10.45 - Coffee break

10.45 – 12.25

Insuring Growth: The Impact of Disaster Funds on Economic Development
Alejandro del Valle, Paris School of Economics, Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet (UC Berkeley and FERDI)

Impact evaluation of CADENA in Mexico
Elizabeth Ramirez, UC Berkeley

12.25 – 13.40 - Lunch / Déjeuner, Océania

Session 4 : The Political economy of protection

Chair: Vianney Dequiedt, Cerdi

13.40 – 15.30 

Voter Response to Natural Disaster Aid
Alan Fuchs, World Bank Group

The political economy of sovereign weather risk protection in Mexico
Laura Boudreau, UC Berkeley and World Bank Group/GFDRR

15.30 –16.30

Round table on priorities for future research

Chair: Emmanuel Skoufias (The World Bank Group)

Speakers:

Francis Ghesquiere, World Bank Group/GFDRR
Peter D’Souza, DFID
Ruth Vargas Hill, The World Bank Group
French Ministry of Finance

16.30-16.45

Lessons learned and future directions

Daniel Clarke, The World Bank Group/GFDRR

 

Ex-ante evaluation of the cost of alternative sovereign DRFI strategies

By Daniel Clarke, Richard Poulter, Olivier Mahul, Tse-Ling The, The World Bank Group

 

Utility, Risk, and Demand for Incomplete Insurance: Lab Experiments with Guatemalan Cooperatives
By Craig McIntosh, University of California San Diego, Felix Povel, Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), Frankfurt, and Elisabeth Sadoulet, University of California Berkeley and Ferdi

 

Insuring Growth: The Impact of Disaster Funds on Economic Development

By Alain de Janvry, Elisabeth Sadoulet, University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow Ferdi, and  Alejandro Del Valle, Paris School of Economics

 

The application of a probabilistic catastrophe risk modelling framework to poverty outcomes: General form vulnerability functions relating household poverty outcomes to hazard intensity in Ethiopia

By Catherine Porter, Heriot-Watt University and Emily White, The World Bank Group

 

The Fiscal Implications of Hurricane Strikes in the Caribbean

By B. Ouattara, University of Manchester; E. Strob, Ecole Polytechnique, J. Vermeiren, Kinetic Analysis Corporation, and S. Yearwood, Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility

 

Ex-Ante Risk Management and Implications for Sustainable Poverty Reduction

By Ruth Hill and Emmanuel Skoufias, The World Bank Group

 

The role of inter-household transfers in coping against post-disaster losses in Madagascar

By Danamona Andrianarimanana, UC Berkeley

 

Occupational Diversification as an Adaptation to Rainfall Variability in Rural India

By Emmanuel Skoufias, Sushenjit Bandyopadhyay, Sergio Olivieri, The World Bank group

 

Managing Risk with Insurance and Savings: Experimental Evidence for Male and Female Farm Managers in the Sahel

By Clara Delavallade, IFPRI; Felipe Dizon and Jean Paul Petraud, University of California, Davis; Ruth Vargas Hill, IFPRI and the World Bank

 

Expanding or increasing : index-based scalable social protection in Niger

By Francesca de Nicola, The World Bank Group

 

Weather-indexed insurance and productivity of small-scale farmers: An impact evaluation of Mexico's CADENA program

By Elizabeth Ramirez Ritchie, UC Berkeley

 

Voters Response to Natural Disasters Aid: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Drought Relief Payment in Mexico

By  Alan Fuchs and Lourdes Rodriguez-Chamussy, The World Bank Group

 

Discipline and disasters: The political economy of Mexico’s Sovereign Disaster Risk Financing Program

By Laura Boudreau, University of California – Berkeley and The World Bank

Salon de la valorisation des sciences humaines et sociales

Participation de la Ferdi et du Cerdi

La Ferdi et le Cerdi ont participé au salon VALOR'SHS organisé par la Maison des sciences de l'Homme sous l'égide de l'université Blaise Pascal, de l'université d'Auvergne et du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS).

Ce premier salon régional dédié à la valorisation des sciences humaines et sociales a réuni des laboratoires de recherche, des chaires d'entreprise, des starts-up issues de laboratoires de recherche.

A cette occasion la Ferdi a présenté le site internet qu'elle a créé et dont l'objet est la construction d'indicateurs : http://byind.ferdi.fr/ et le Cerdi a présenté les travaux de trois de ses doctorants :

- la promotion du financement des PME en Afrique subsaharienne, Pierrick Baraton ;

- un projet de recherche avec les services douaniers, Cyril Chalendard ;

- l'activité et l'efficience à l'hôpital en Chine, Laurène Petitfour.

Plus de détails et inscriptions sur le site du salon : http://salonvalor-shs.sciencesconf.org/