Français

CGIAR Conference on Impacts of International Agricultural Research

champs de blé Alain de Janvry, University of California, Berkeley and Ferdi, presented a communication on the technology adoption puzzle.

From 6th to 8th July 2017, the Standing Panel on Impact Assessment (SPIA) of the ISPC and the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions and Markets (PIM) organized a major conference on assessing the impacts of agricultural research. The conference was hosted by the World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF) at its campus in Nairobi, Kenya

The objectives of the conference were to present and discuss rigorous evidence from recent studies on how and how much agricultural research has contributed to development outcomes related to CGIAR goals of reduced poverty, improved nutrition and health, and improved natural resource management.

As part of the conference, Prof Alain de Janvry, University of California, Berkeley and Ferdi, presented a communication on the technology adoption puzzle :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

programme : http://ispc.cgiar.org/

Forthcoming : Formation de haut niveau sur l’adoption des nouvelles technologies agricoles

 

Conférence CGIAR sur les impacts de la recherche internationale sur l’agriculture

champs de blé Alain de Janvry, Université de Berkeley, Californie et senior fellow Ferdi, a présenté une communication sur la difficulté que représente l’adoption des technologies agricoles.

Du 6 au 8 juillet 2017, le the Standing Panel on Impact Assessment (SPIA) du ISPC et le programme de recherche sur les politiques, institutions et marchés du CGIAR ont organisé une conférence sur l’évaluation des impacts de la recherche agricole. La conférence était accueillie sur le campus de World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF).

Les objectifs de la conférence étaient de présenter et de discuter des derniers résultats des études portant sur l’impact de la recherche agricole sur le développement en relation avec les objectifs du CGIAR de réduction de la pauvreté, d’amélioration de la nutrition et de la santé, et de l’amélioration de la gestion des ressources naturelles.

Lors de cette conférence, le professeur Alain de Janvry a présenté une communication sur la difficulté que représente l’adoption des technologies agricoles :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

programme : http://ispc.cgiar.org/

A venir : Formation de haut niveau sur l’adoption des nouvelles technologies agricoles

 

 

2nd High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation

2e réunion de haut niveau du Partenariat global pour l'efficacité de la coopération au développement AFD, Ferdi, WAEMU and CAEMC co-organised the side event : Addressing state fragility and country vulnerabilities in aid allocation to reach poor and vulnerable people

During the 2nd High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, the Foundation for International Development Study and Research (FERDI) in collaboration with the Agence française de développement (French Agency for Development - AFD), the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC - CEMAC) and the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU - UEMOA) organised on 30th November 2016 the side event : Addressing state fragility and country vulnerabilities in aid allocation to reach poor and vulnerable people.

The side event considered risks related to country and people’s vulnerability, and how taking into account vulnerabilities in resource allocation mechanisms can cover them. The event convened participants to discuss 1/ Whether concessional resources should be directed to people or to countries, 2/ Whether country categories could be relevant in allocating concessional resources and, if so, 3/ How different country categories should be handled?

The panelists were :

  • Euphrasie Kouassi Yao, Minister for Promotion of Women, the Family and the Protection of Children, Republic of Côte d'Ivoire
  • Gyan Chandra Acharya, UN Under Secretary General and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States
  • Jake Grover, Senior Policy Advisor, Department of Policy and Evaluation, Millennium Challenge Corporation
  • Philippe Orliange, Director for Strategy, AFD
  • Patrick Guillaumont, President of Ferdi

 

Minutes of the meeting

The panelists admitted the importance of targeting assistance on the countries whose structural vulnerabilities are the strongest.

Gyan Acharya underlined that achieving the SDGs will require a better consideration of vulnerability criteria in allocation of concessional resources.

Patrick Guillaumont pointed out the principle of equity which justifies in particular the use of the EVI (economic vulnerability index) in allocation of development assistance. If the largest number of poor people live in middle-income countries, these people have generally more ways to cope with their economic vulnerabilities. The same applies to other forms of vulnerability such as sociopolitical, or climate change in decisions to allocate adaptation funds. The panelists agreed on the excessive rigidity which establishes a category of countries in an allocation process. Patrick Guillaumont insisted on the relevance to consider criteria of vulnerability rather than categories of countries in order not to avoid thresholds in allocations to better take into account the various degrees of vulnerabilities and their different aspects. He reminded the recent resolution on the "smooth transition" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly inviting its members to favor the criteria for identifying LDCs in their aid allocation.

Euphrasie Kouassi Yao and Philippe Orliange recalled that LDCs are not the only vulnerable countries. For Minister Yao, middle-income countries are facing vulnerabilities that need to be addressed. She considers that the national level is much more relevant, notably because NGOs  can create "duplicates". Philippe Orliange took the example of Lebanon which, in spite of a relatively high per capita income (Lebanon is an upper-middle-income country), is facing a political and regional vulnerability that is difficult to cope alone. He suggested that a regional vulnerability criterion should be taken into account in order to consider the risks of  crisis contagion. He announced the creation of a facility on vulnerability mitigation and crisis response implemented by the AFD and endowed with a budget of 100 million euros per year. He underlined also that developing partners does not necessarily seek ODA but also technical solutions, that qualifies aid allocation issue for which flexibility and adaptation capacity must be prioritized when possible.

Gyan Acharya insisted on the need for developing countries to improve their capacity to build resilience. He underlined the low level of commitment to vulnerable countries, especially LDCs.

Jake Grover presented the concept of Millenium Challenge Coproration for allocation. The MCC focuses on needs and "merit" criteria. Regarding the needs criteria, the MCC targets only low-income countries and low middle-income countries. Regarding the merit criteria, the MCC includes some twenty indicators measuring in particular the rule of law and the degree of economic freedoms. MCC does not target a specific category of countries and does not work with failed states but invests increasingly in institutional fragility issues. The MCC example illustrates the dilemma between seeking performance and the need to address vulnerabilities.

As Patrick Guillaumont pointed out, the weight of macroeconomic performance in allocation models is an important subject of debate, especially for multilateral development banks that need consensus on the formula definition in which the vulnerabilities need to be considered. The European Commission model whose formula evolved in this direction under the impulse of works  by the Ferdi is an example.

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

2e réunion de haut niveau du Partenariat global pour l'efficacité de la coopération au développement

2e réunion de haut niveau du Partenariat global pour l'efficacité de la coopération au développement L'AFD, la Ferdi, l'UEMOA et la CEMAC ont co-organisé l'événement parallèle: Comment traiter les vulnérabilités et les fragilités des États par l'allocation de l'aide?

La Ferdi, en partenariat avec l'Agence française de développement (AFD), la Communauté économique et monétaire d'Afrique centrale (CEMAC) et l'Union économique et monétaire ouest-africaine (UEMOA), a organisé le 30 Novembre 2016 un événement parallèle sur "Comment traiter les vulnérabilités et les fragilités des États par l'allocation de l'aide" lors de la 2e réunion de haut niveau du Partenariat global pour l'efficacité de la coopération au développement qui s'est tenue du 28 Novembre au 1er Décembre à Nairobi (Kenya).

L'évènement a traité de la couverture des risques que connaissent les pays et les populations vulnérables par une meilleure prise en compte des vulnérabilités dans l’allocation des ressources concessionnelles. Les participants étaient invités à répondre à trois questions: i) Les ressources les plus concessionnelles doivent-elles plutôt cibler les pays ou les individus?; ii) Est-il pertinent de distinguer des catégories de pays dans l'allocation? ; iii) Dans ce cas, comment considérer les différentes catégories de pays?


Il a réuni :

  • Euphrasie Kouassi Yao, Ministre de la Promotion de la Femme, de la Famille et de la Protection de l'Enfant , République de Côte d'Ivoire
  • Gyan Chandra Acharya, Secrétaire général adjoint des Nations unies et Haut Représentant des PMA, des petits Etats insulaires et des pays enclavés
  • Jake Grover, Senior Policy Advisor, Département des politiques et de l'évaluation, Millennium Challenge Corporation
  • Philippe Orliange, Directeur exécutif pour la Stratégie de l'AFD
  • Patrick Guillaumont, Président de la Ferdi et modérateur de la session.

 

Compte-rendu

Les panélistes ont tous reconnu l'importance de cibler les ressources sur les pays dont les vulnérabilités structurelles sont les plus fortes.

Gyan Acharya a souligné que l'atteinte des ODD passera par une prise en compte plus franche des critères de vulnérabilités dans les allocations de ressources concessionnelles.

Patrick Guillaumont a rappelé à ce titre le principe d'équité qui justifie notamment l'emploi de l'EVI (indice de vulnérabilité économique) dans les allocations d'aide au développement. Si un plus grand nombre de pauvres se trouvent dans les pays à revenu intermédiaires, ces derniers disposent généralement de plus de moyens pour faire face à leurs vulnérabilités économiques. Il en va de même pour les autres formes de vulnérabilité comme celles socio-politiques, ou encore la vulnérabilité au changement climatique dans les décisions d'allocation des fonds d'adaptation. Les panélistes se sont accordés sur la trop grande rigidité que constitue une catégorie de pays dans un processus d'allocation. Patrick Guillaumont a insisté sur la pertinence de considérer des critères de vulnérabilité plutôt que des catégories de pays afin de ne pas créer des seuils dans les allocations et de mieux tenir compte des degrés variés de vulnérabilités et de leurs différents aspects. Il a rappelé la récente résolution sur la "transition douce" adoptée par l'Assemblée des Nations Unies invitant ses membres à privilégier les critères d'identification des PMA dans l'allocation de leur aide.

Euphrasie Kouassi Yao et Philippe Orliange ont rappelé qu'il n'y a pas que les PMA qui soient vulnérables. Pour la Ministre Yao, les pays à revenus intermédiaires font face à des vulnérabilités qu'il est nécessaire d'accompagner. En réponse à la première question, elle estime que l'échelon national est beaucoup plus pertinent, passer par les ONG créant des "doublons". Philippe Orliange a pris quant à lui l'exemple du Liban qui, malgré un revenu par tête relativement élevé (le Liban est un pays à revenu intermédiaire de la tranche supérieure), fait face à une vulnérabilité politique et régionale difficile à juguler seul. Il a proposé qu'un critère de vulnérabilité régionale soit pris en compte afin de considérer les risques de contagion des crises. Il a annoncé à cette occasion la création d'une facilité d'atténuation des vulnérabilités et de réponses aux crises mise en oeuvre par l'AFD et dotée d'un budget de 100 millions d'euros par an. Il a également souligné que les interlocuteurs de l'AFD dans les pays en développement ne recherchent pas nécessairement de l'aide mais plutôt des éléments de solutions techniques, ce qui nuance quelque peu la question de l'allocation de l'aide pour laquelle il faut privilégier lorsque cela est possible souplesse et capacité d'adaptation.

Gyan Acharya a insisté sur le besoin de construire la résilience et a souligné le faible respect des engagements envers les pays vulnérables, et plus particulièrement les PMA.

Jake Grover a quant à lui présenté l'approche du Millenium Challenge Coproration (MCC) en matière d'allocation. Le MCC privilégie des critères de besoins et de "mérite". En matière de besoins, le MCC ne cible que des PFR et des PRITI. En matière de mérite, le MCC considère une vingtaine d'indicateurs mesurant notamment l'Etat de droit et le degré de libertés économiques. Le MCC ne cible pas particulièrement une catégorie de pays et ne travaille pas avec les Etats faillis mais investit de plus en plus le champs des fragilités institutionnelles. L'exemple du MCC illustre le dilemme entre la recherche de performance et le besoin de s'attaquer aux vulnérabilités.

Comme l'a rappelé Patrick Guillaumont, le poids de la performance macroéconomique dans les modèles d'allocation est un sujet de débat important, particulièrement pour les Banques multilatérales de développement qui ont besoin d'un consensus autour de formules dans lesquelles les vulnérabilités doivent trouver leur place. Le modèle de la Commission européenne dont la formule a évolué dans ce sens sous l'impulsion de travaux de la Ferdi en est un exemple.

 

Fourteenth Ministerial Conference of UNCTAD

UNCTAD Matthieu Boussichas was a panelist at the session "Making Trade Work (better) for Africa and LDCs: How to Ensure that Trade is Inclusive and Pro-Poor"

The quadrennial ministerial Conference is the highest decision-making body of UNCTAD. It is widely attended by stakeholders in development including Heads of State and Government, Ministers and representatives of governments, international institutions, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions and the private sector. It sets UNCTAD's mandate and work priorities and, thanks to its design of formal and informal sessions, facilitates dialogue on the world's key and emerging issues affecting the global economy, discusses policy options and formulates global policy responses. The Conference includes high-level round tables on key issues in the international economic debate. Informal thematic side events are also held with the aim to promote interactive discussions on development issues. The World Investment Forum and a Commodities Forum, which are an integral part of the Conference, bring together thousands of business and government representatives to advance developing countries' participation in these sectors. This year the theme was "From decision to action: moving toward an inclusive and equitable global economic environment for trade and development".

Matthieu Boussichas, Programme Manager at Ferdi was a panelist for the session :

Making Trade Work (better) for Africa and LDCs: How to Ensure that Trade is Inclusive and Pro-Poor

21 July 2016, 16:30 - 18:00
Kenyatta International Conference Centre, Nairobi
Room: Tsavo 1

DESCRIPTION

Rapid trade and output growth in the past two decades have contributed to a significant decrease in poverty rates worldwide. But still too many remain left behind. In Africa and LDCs, even the best years of trade growth – and increased export earnings – were insufficiently and inadequately associated with diversification, economic transformation and poverty reduction. In most of these countries a crucial missing link between trade performance and social progress has been the fact that trade growth has not been accompanied by structural economic transformation, nor by strong employment expansion, both of which would have led to the creation of more and better jobs for these countries’ population and, hence, quicker poverty reduction. At the policy level, often there has been limited integration and synergy between trade policy and national development policies. This Round Table discussed how to better strengthen the links between these policies, so as to reinforce the role of trade as a means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). More information


KEY ISSUES

  • How to strengthen the contribution of foreign trade to poverty reduction in Africa and LDCs?
  • How can synergies be created between trade policy and FDI policy, so as to accelerate social progress?
  • What are the best mechanisms to build the links between trade and structural economic transformation?
  • What role should the international community play in accelerating progress?
  • What strategies should Africa and LDCs follow to diversify and upgrade exports?
  • How can the impact of trade on the creation of quality employment be strengthened?
  •  What are the best ways to take into account the changing international trade scene (global value chains, e-commerce…) into national trade policymaking?
  •  How can national policymakers maximize the developmental gains from (mega) regional trade agreements?

PARTICIPANTS
Opening remarks: Mr Guillermo Valles, Director, Division for International Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities, and Officer-in-Charge, Division for Africa, Least Developed Countries and Special Programmes, UNCTAD
Moderator: Mr. Ratnakar Adhikari, Executive Director, Enhanced Integrated Framework (EIF)
Panelists:

  • H.E. Ms. Jessy Carmelle Petit Frère, Minister of Trade and Industry, Haiti
  • H.E. Mr. Phoho Joshua Setipa, Minister of Trade and Industry, Lesotho
  • Ms, Jodie Keane Commonwealth Secretariat
  • Mr. Darlington Mwape, Senior Fellow, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Developemnt (ICTSD)
  • Mr. Aeneas Chapinga Chuma, Assistant Director General and Regional Director for Africa, International Labour Organization (ILO)
  • Mr. Yao Graham, Co-ordinator, Third World Network - Africa
  • Mr. Sekai Nzena, Head of a Public Affairs, Amatheon Agri Holding N.V.
  • Mr. Matthieu Boussichas, Programme Manager, Foundation for International Development Study and Research (Ferdi)

CONTACT
M. Rolf Traeger, Chef, Section des PMA, CNUCED
EMail: rolf.traeger@unctad.org

More information : http://unctad14.org

 

14e conférence ministérielle de la CNUCED

CNUCED Matthieu Boussichas était panéliste pour la session "Rendre le commerce (plus) utile pour l'Afrique et les PMA : Comment veiller à ce que le commerce soit inclusif et pro-pauvres "

La conférence ministérielle quadriennale est l'instance suprême de la CNUCED. De nombreux acteurs du développement y participent, notamment des chefs d'état et de gouvernement, des ministres et des représentants du gouvernement, des organisations internationales et non-gouvernementales, des représentants du milieu universitaire ainsi que du secteur privé. Le mandat de la CNUCED ainsi que les priorités de travail sont décidés au cours de la conférence. Le format de la conférence, qui est faite de sessions formelles et informelles, engage le dialogue sur des thématiques essentielles et émergentes ayant trait à l'économie mondiale, permet de débattre des options politiques et définit des moyens d'action à l'échelle mondiale.

Le thème de la 14e conférence était : "Des décisions aux actions : Vers un environnement économique mondial équitable et solidaire au service du commerce et du développement."

Lors de cette conférence, Matthieu Boussichas, Responsable de programme à la Ferdi a participé à la session "Rendre le commerce (plus) utile pour l'Afrique et les PMA : Comment veiller à ce que le commerce soit inclusif et pro-pauvres" où il est intervenu sur la question de l’évaluation de la contribution de l’aide pour le commerce à la réduction de la pauvreté. L’idée principale défendue est que, même si l’évaluation est rendue difficile par un manque de données et le caractère flou du concept d’aide pour le commerce, il apparaît que l’aide pour le commerce est efficace à réduire la pauvreté si celle-ci est ciblée sur les pays à forts handicaps structurels dans un but de financer à la fois des infrastructures matérielles et immatérielles qui contribuent à réduire les coûts du commerce.

Rendre le commerce (plus) utile pour l'Afrique et les PMA : Comment veiller à ce que le commerce soit inclusif et pro-pauvres"

jeudi, 21 juillet
16:30-18:00, KICC TSAVO 1 room

DESCRIPTION
La croissance rapide du commerce et de la production dans les deux dernières décennies ont conduit à une diminution significative des taux de pauvreté dans le monde entier. Mais il reste encore beaucoup à faire. En Afrique et dans les PMA, même les meilleures années de croissance du commerce - et d'augmentation des recettes d'exportation - ne se sont pas adéquatement traduites dans la diversification, la transformation économique et la réduction de la pauvreté. Dans la plupart de ces pays, un chaînon manquant essentiel entre la performance commerciale et le progrès social a été le fait que la croissance du commerce n'a pas été accompagnée d'une transformation économique structurelle, ni par une forte expansion de l'emploi, lesquels auraient conduit à la création de postes de travail plus nombreux et de meilleure qualité pour la population de ces pays et, par conséquent, à une réduction de la pauvreté plus vigoureuse. Au niveau des politiques publiques, souvent il n’y a eu guère d’intégration et de synergie entre la politique commerciale et les politiques nationales de développement. Cette table ronde a discuté de la façon de mieux resserrer les liens entre ces politiques, de manière à renforcer le rôle du commerce en tant que moyen de mise en oeuvre des objectifs de développement durable (ODD). En savoir plus


QUESTIONS ESSENTIELLES
• Comment renforcer la contribution du commerce extérieur à la réduction de la pauvreté en Afrique et dans les PMA ?
• Comment peut-on créer des synergies entre la politique commerciale et la politique d'IED afin d’accélérer le progrès social ?
• Quels sont les meilleurs mécanismes pour établir des liens entre le commerce et la transformation économique structurelle ?
• Quel rôle la communauté internationale doit-elle jouer dans l'accélération des progrès ?
• Quelles stratégies l’Afrique et les PMA devraient-ils mettre en oeuvre pour diversifier et mettre à niveau leurs exportations ?
• Comment l'impact du commerce sur la création d'emplois de qualité peut-il être renforcé ?
• Quelles sont les meilleurs moyens de prendre en compte les changements de l’environnement commercial international (chaînes de valeur mondiales, cybercommerce ...) dans l'élaboration des politiques commerciales nationales ?
• Comment les décideurs nationaux peuvent-ils tirer des bénéfices dans le domaine du développement des (méga) accords commerciaux régionaux ?
 

PARTICIPANTS
Remarques d'ouverture: M.Guillermo Valles, Directeur de la Division du commerce international des biens et services, et des produits de base et Directeur par intérim de la Division de l'Afrique, des pays les moins avancés et des programmes spéciaux de la CNUCED

Modérateur: M. Ratnakar Adhikari, Directeur exécutif, Cadre intégré renforcé (CIR)

Panélistes:
S.E. Mme. Jessy Carmelle Petit Frère, Ministre du Commerce et de l’Industrie, Haïti
S.E. M. Phoho Joshua Setipa, Ministre du Commerce et de l’Industrie, Lesotho
Mme Jodie Keane, Secrétariat du Commonwealth
M. Darlington Mwape, Chercheur principal, Centre international pour le commerce et le développement durable (ICTSD)
M. Aeneas Chapinga Chuma, Sous-Directeur Général et Directeur régional pour l’Afrique, Bureau International du Travail (BIT)
M. Yao Graham, Coordinateur, Third World Network - Africa
Mme Sekai Nzena, Cheffe des Affaires publiques, Amatheon Agri Holding N.V.
M. Matthieu Boussichas, Responsable de programme, Fondation pour les Études et Recherches sur le Développement International (Ferdi)

 

COMPTE-RENDU DÉTAILLÉ
par Matthieu Boussichas, Responsable de programme à la Ferdi

M. Adhikari a introduit la session en rappelant qu’un des défis restants en Afrique est la diversification des exportations, limitées et à faible valeur ajoutée et par conséquent peu favorables aux pauvres. Il a dressé une liste de sujets d’importance, à l’instar de ses autres interventions dans d’autres tables rondes, notamment le besoin de promouvoir l’intégration régionale, de renforcer les capacités des administrations et de réellement enclencher une dynamique de transformation structurelle. Ces trois sujets ont été mentionnés systématiquement dans quasiment toutes les tables rondes auxquelles j’ai participé, souvent de façon assez peu substantielle. Lire plus

 

Plus d'informations sur la 14e conférencence de la CNUCED : http://unctad14.org

 

Trade and Development Symposium

An E15 Initiative. Jaime de Melo, Scientific Advisor at Ferdi was a speaker for four sessions.

ICTSD launched the E15 Initiative in 2011 to stimulate a fresh, strategic look at key challenges and opportunities for the global trade and investment system and improve its efficacy, fairness, and inclusiveness as well as its ability to promote sustainable development.

Since then, ICTSD, the World Economic Forum, and 16 partnering institutions have brought together more than 375 leading international experts in over 80 interactive dialogues. 

From 14 to 17 December 2015, ICTSD has organised the Trade and Development Symposium in partnership with the University of Nairobi and the Saana Institute, with the support of the Republic of Kenya.

Jaime de Melo, Scientific Advisor at Ferdi was a speaker for four sessions  :

 

Trade, Nature and the 2030 Agenda: The Quest for Policy Coherence

Tuesday 15 December
Session organised by ICTSD, IISD et Earth Mind
 
 
Moderator : Ricardo MELENDEZ-ORTIZ, Chief Executive Officer, ICTSD
 
Speakers:
- Selina JACKSON, Special Representative to the UN and the WTO, World Bank
- David RUNNALLS, Distinguished Fellow and former President, International Institute for Sustainable Development
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Emeritus Professor, University of Geneva and Scientific Director Ferdi
- Daudi SUMBA, Vice President, Government Relations & Program Design, African Wildlife Foundation
- Ana ESCOBEDO, Director of International Government Affairs, ArcelorMittal
 
Session objectives 
The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and supported by the commitments made in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA), was adopted in September 2015. Among the set of global priorities, the Agenda includes reform of illegal and unsustainable resource extraction (including illegal fishing, and the poaching and trafficking of protected species) and promotion of sustainable marine and terrestrial resource use. 
As the attention of policy-makers and civil society turns to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, this high-level panel discussion will explore the key inter-dependencies between trade, environment, and other policy areas that need to be addressed to build a coherent policy framework to support legal and sustainable trade in wild natural resources and the achievement of the 2030 Agenda. 

presentation by Jaime de Melo

 
 

 

Harnessing Manufacturing to Africa's Trade and Growth: From Lagging to Leading Sector

Wednesday 16 December 2015
Session organised by International Growth Centre (IGC) and Ferdi.
 

Moderator : Dr. Richard NEWFARMER, Country Director for Rwanda, Uganda and South Sudan, The International Growth Centre

Speakers :
- John PAGE, Country Director, The International Growth Centre
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Emeritus Professor, University of Geneva and Scientific Advisor at Ferdi
- Dr. Stephen KARINGI, Director, Regional Integration and Trade Division, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa
 
Session objectives 

Although Africa has seen celebrated improvement in its economic performance in recent decades, the region’s slow underlying pace of structural change has led some observers to be pessimistic about Africa’s prospects. Indeed, its manufacturing sector constitute a smaller share of output and employment in Africa now than in the mid-1980 and its share of world manufactured exports has fallen during the same period. Recent research, analysing how differences in countries policies and institutional approaches affect industrialisation, has pointed toward government policy playing a crucial role in incentivizing deepened growth in Africa’s manufacturing sector.  Is Africa doomed to slow growth and technological change because its manufacturing sector is small?  What are the major impediments to its future expansion?  What is the appropriate role for industrial policy?  The session will explore reasons for the slow take off of manufacturing and policies designed to spur further industrial growth.

 

Role of Trade Facilitation in the Context of Increasing Regional Integration of LDCs

Thursday 17 December 2015
Organised by LDC IV Monitor, Southern Voice and the Centre for Policy Dialogue.

Moderator : Dr. Debapriya BHATTACHARYA, Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue

Speakers :
- Prof. Mustafizur RAHMAN, Executive Director, Centre for Policy Dialogue
- Nicolas IMBODEN, Partner & Co-founder, IDEAS Centre
- Dr. Ratnakar ADHIKARI, Executive Director, Enhanced Integrated Framework Executive Secretariat, World Trade Organization
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Emeritus Professor, University of Geneva and Scientific Advisor at Ferdi
- Dr. Jodie KEANE, Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute
 
Session objectives :

The session on "Role of Trade Facilitation in the Context of Increasing Regional Integration of LDCs", organised by the LDC IV Monitor along with Southern Voice on Post-MDG International Development Goals and the Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD), envisages to explore possible avenues and modalities to implement the needed Trade Facilitation (TF) measures which could help the least developed countries (LDCs) in their efforts to take advantage of increasing regional integration of their economies. The objectives of the session are to: (a) identify the emerging TF-related deficits in view of regional integration of the LDCs; (b) examine concrete measures to address these deficits; and (c) explore possible supportive measures including finance to help LDCs in implementing TF measures

presentations by Jaime de Melo :

 

Thursday 17 December 2015

Organised by ICTSD

Moderator : Amb. Darlington MWAPE, Senior Fellow, ICTSD

Speakers :

- Dr. Debapriya BHATTACHARYA, Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue
- Christophe BELLMANN, Senior Resident Research Fellow, ICTSD
- Dr. Mia MIKIC, Chief, Trade Policy and Analysis – Trade and Investment Division,United Nations Economic and Social Commission for the Asia and the Pacific
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Emeritus Professor, University of Geneva and Scientific Advisor at Ferdi
- Yaw ANSU, Chief Economist, African Center for Economic Transformation

Session objectives 

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and supported by the commitments made in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA), was adopted in September 2015. Paragraph 86 of the AAAA invites the WTO General Council to consider the WTO’s contribution to sustainable development.  To date, there has not been much public discussion of how this invitation will be taken up. 

This session provides space for an informal conversation among experts about how the WTO’s General Council could respond to this invitation, and specifically to identify what key contributions the WTO could, or should, make to sustainable development in the next 15 years.

 

 

 

 

 

Harnessing Manufacturing to Africa's Trade and Growth: From Lagging to Leading Sector

 

Harnessing Manufacturing to Africa's Trade and Growth: From Lagging to Leading Sector

 

Role of Trade Facilitation in the Context of Increasing Regional Integration of LDCs

 

 

Symposium commerce et développement

Un événement organisé dans le cadre de l'Initiative E15. Jaime de Melo, Directeur scientifique de la Ferdi est intervenu sur quatre sessions

L'Initiative E15 a été lancée en 2011 par l'International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Developemnt (ICTSD) pour stimuler une vision nouvelle et stratégique des opportunités et défis liés au commerce international et à l'investissement. L'objectif est d'améliorer l'efficacité, l'équité et l'inclusion du commerce international et de l'investissement pour promouvoir le développement durable.

Depuis sa création, l'ICTSD, le World Economic Forum et 16 institutions partenaires  ont organisé plus de 80 rencontres interactives réunissant plus de 375 experts internationaux de haut niveau.

Du 14 au 17 décembre 2015, l'ICTSD a organisé son symposium annuel en partenariat avec l'Unniversité de Nairobi et le Saana Institute, avec le soutien de la République du Kenya. Le Symposium représentait une plate-forme essentielle pour la recherche intellectuelle et le dialogue sur l'avenir du système commercial multilatéral.

Jaime de Melo, Directeur scientifique de la Ferdi est intervenu sur quatre sessions :

 

Trade, Nature and the 2030 Agenda: The Quest for Policy Coherence

mardi 15 décembre
Session organisée par ICTSD, IISD et Earth Mind
 
Les participants :
 
Modérateur : Ricardo MELENDEZ-ORTIZ, Chief Executive Officer, ICTSD
 
Intervenants :
- Selina JACKSON, Special Representative to the UN and the WTO, World Bank
- David RUNNALLS, Distinguished Fellow and former President, International Institute for Sustainable Development
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Emeritus Professor, University of Geneva and Scientific Director Ferdi
- Daudi SUMBA, Vice President, Government Relations & Program Design, African Wildlife Foundation
- Ana ESCOBEDO, Director of International Government Affairs, ArcelorMittal

présentation de Jaime de Melo

 
 
 
 

Harnessing Manufacturing to Africa's Trade and Growth: From Lagging to Leading Sector

mercredi 16 décembre 2015
Session organisée par l'International Growth Centre (IGC) et la Ferdi.
 

Les participants :

Modérateur : Dr. Richard NEWFARMER, Country Director for Rwanda, Uganda and South Sudan, The International Growth Centre

Intervenants :

- John PAGE, Directeur régional, The International Growth Centre
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Professeur Emerite de l'Université de Genève et Directeur scientifique de la Ferdi
- Dr. Stephen KARINGI, Directeur, Division Intégration régionale et commerce, Commission économique des Nations unies pour l'Afrique
 
Objectifs de la session :

Bien que le continent africain ait été salué pour ses performances économiques de ces dernières décennies, la région connait une transformation structurelle lente de son économie, conduisant les observateurs à être pessimistes quant aux perspectives. En effet, en Afrique, la part du secteur industriel dans la production et l'emploi a diminué par rapport au milieu des années 80 et la part des exportations manufacturées africaines a également diminué sur cette même période. Des recherches récentes ont analysé comment les politiques différentes des Etats et les approches institutionnelles affectent l'industrialisation. Elles montrent que les politiques des gouvernements jouent un rôle crucial en impulsant une croissance profonde du secteur industriel en Afrique. L'Afrique est-elle condamnée à une croissance et à des changemet technologiques ralentis parce que son industrie manufacturière est petite ?  Quels sont les empêchements principaux à sa future expansion ?  Quel est le rôle approprié pour une politique industrielle ?  La session explorera les raisons du lent décollage de l'industrie et des politiques conçues pour stimuler davantage de croissance industrielle.

présentation de Jaime de Melo

"Industrial and Structural Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa"

 

 

Role of Trade Facilitation in the Context of Increasing Regional Integration of LDCs

jeudi 17 décembre 2015

Organisée par LDC IV Monitor, Southern Voice et le Centre for Policy Dialogue.

Les participants :

Modérateur : Dr. Debapriya BHATTACHARYA, Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue

Intervenants :

- Prof. Mustafizur RAHMAN, Directeur exécutif, Centre for Policy Dialogue
- Nicolas IMBODEN, Partenaire et co-fondateur, IDEAS Centre
- Dr. Ratnakar ADHIKARI, Directeur exéctutif, Secrétariat exécutif du Cadre intégré renforcé, Organisation mondiale du commerce
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Professeur Emerite de l'Université de Genève et Directeur scientifique de la Ferdi
- Dr. Jodie KEANE, Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute
 
Objectifs de la session :
 
La session souhaite explorer les voies possibles et les modalités pour la mise en application des mesures de "facilitation des échanges" (Trade Facilitation (TF)) qui pourraient aider les pays les moins avancés (PMA) dans leurs efforts à tirer profit de l'intégration régionale croissante de leurs économies. Les objectifs de la session sont : identifier les déficits émergents de TF dans le cadre de l'intégration régionale des PMA; (b) examiner les mesures concrètes pour résoudre ces déficits; et (c) explorer les mesures d'aide possible incluant le financement pour aider les PMA à mettre en oeuvre ces TF.
 

présentations de Jaime de Melo :

 
 
 
jeudi 17 décembre 2015
Organisée par ICTSD
 
Les participants :
 

Modérateur : Amb. Darlington MWAPE, Senior Fellow, ICTSD

Intervenants :

- Dr. Debapriya BHATTACHARYA, Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue
- Christophe BELLMANN, Senior Resident Research Fellow, ICTSD
- Dr. Mia MIKIC, Responsable des politiques commerciales et analyses, Division du Commerce et de l'Investissement, Commission économique et sociale des Nations unies pour l'Asie et le Pacific.
- Prof. Jaime DE MELO, Professeur Emerite de l'Université de Genève et Directeur scientifique de la Ferdi
- Yaw ANSU, Economiste en Chef, African Center for Economic Transformation
 
Objectifs de la session :

L'agenda 2030 des Nations unies pour le développement durable comprenant les Objectifs de Développement Durable (ODD) et soutenu par les engagements pris dans le cadre du Programme d'Action d'Addis Abeba (AAAA) a été adopté en septembre 2015. Le paragraphe 86 du Programme invite le Conseil général de l'OMC à étudier la contribution de l'OMC au développement durable. À ce jour, il n'y a pas eu beaucoup de débat public sur la façon dont cette invitation sera repris.

Cette session avait pour objectif d'inviter à une discussion informelle antre experts sur la manière dont le Conseil général pourrait répondre à cette invitation et de manière spécifique d'identifier quelles contributions clés, l'OMC pourrait, ou devrait, apporter au développement durable dans les 15 prochaines années.

 

 
 

Trade, Nature and the 2030 Agenda: The Quest for Policy Coherence

 

Harnessing Manufacturing to Africa's Trade and Growth: From Lagging to Leading Sector

 

Role of Trade Facilitation in the Context of Increasing Regional Integration of LDCs