Indéfini
Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Graduation and Differentiation, with regard to Vulnerability and Fragility

ONU Side event organized by UN-OHRLLS and Ferdi at the 6th Biennial High-level Meeting of the Development Cooperation Forum (DCF) - ECOSOC

On the occasion of the 2018 Development Cooperation Forum, and in collaboration with the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the LDCs, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS), Ferdi organized a side event on the graduation and differentiation of countries.

This event held in New York, May 21, 2018.

Moderated by Patrick Guillaumont, Chairman of the Ferdi, it brought together the following panelists:

Shamshad Akhtar, USG and Executive Secretary of UN ESCAP

Roland Mollerus, Chief, Secretariat of the Committee for Development Policy (UN-DESA)

Robin Ogilvy, Special Representative of the OECD to the United Nations

Susanna Wolf, Senior Programme Officer at UN OHRLLS

Nguéto Tiraina Yambaye, Former Minister of Economy and Development Planning of Chad, and former Executive Director of African group II at IMF 

Background and objectives

The objective of the side event was to discuss the importance of taking into account vulnerabilities in the differentiation of countries, the definition of categories of countries and in the way donors ensure a smooth transition for graduated countries. 

Building sustainability and resilience through development cooperation implies taking into account the various types of vulnerability – economic, social and climatic – faced by developing countries.

For the least developed countries, vulnerability, which is a key element of the category, is not a compulsory criterion of graduation from the LDC category, but is also considered more qualitatively. The UN General Assembly invited development partners to take it into account in their aid allocation, as a way to promote a smooth transition after graduation. At a higher level of income per capita vulnerability has also been recognized as an element to be taken into account for the graduation from the DAC list of developing countries eligible for ODA.

Furthermore, regarding graduation at intermediate levels of income, especially for the financial instruments of differentiation of multilateral development banks, vulnerability is not systematicallyconsidered, while state fragility may involve a special treatment.  

The side event gathered senior representatives of governments, international institutions and of civil society to discuss how vulnerability and fragility can be consistently taken into account.

To read : background informationa by Shamshad Akhtar

Brief report

The side event discussed the importance of taking into account vulnerabilities in the differentiation of countries, the definition of categories of countries and the way in which donors ensure a smooth transition for graduated countries. 

There are many reasons justifying the differentiation of partnerships for development, in particular the great heterogeneity of the countries, some being in very specific situations.

This need for differentiation implies rules, automatic or discretionary. The simple use of the level of per capita income turns out to be reductive; thus, taking into account of criteria of vulnerability (even though this concept is difficult to define precisely) seems relevant and suitable for the integration of sustainability in the development.

Where the application of a policy measure is not binary, the use of continuous criteria rather than discontinuous categories of countries turns out to be more relevant: This allows to avoid the effects of thresholds, to differentiate countries within a category, and to smooth the graduation from the category.

The use of continuous criteria also avoids instability in belonging to a category for countries whose characteristics are close to the thresholds for inclusion and graduation (although graduation and inclusion may respond to asymmetric rules to avoid this problem of reversibility, as with the LDCs for example).

An implication of this debate concerns the allocation of aid. The debate particularly addressed the case of middle-income countries because of the large number of poor they count and a possible loss of external resources they face when they come out of the category of LDCs or low-income countries. It is however the responsibility of graduated countries - who are supposed to know an improvement in their economy – to share this improvement with the poorest sections of their population. In addition, the LDC category (or the criteria that define it) brings together countries generally affected by structural handicaps significantly greater than in the other categories of countries.

It was also discussed the importance of taking into account the root causes of the conflicts which are nowadays the main catalyzer for vulnerabilities and fragilities, in order to avoid, in the long run, consuming an important part of concessional resources in favor of a category of countries identified as fragile. This point illustrates the relevance to consider continuous variables to identify weaknesses in early stages and to take them into account in the allocation rather than categories to which countries become members only when their weaknesses are important enough to be taken into account.

The case of the LDCs especially illustrates the topic of the side event. The binary nature of belonging or not to the category means abrupt changes in the status of countries and their access to many measures - while development is an ongoing process.

Graduated LDCs can no longer be eligible for specific support measures reserved for them while they are facing plenty of persistent vulnerabilities. United Nations support graduated countries and encourage donors to put in place mechanisms to smooth the effects of thresholds. It is in this spirit that the United Nations General Assembly has invited donors to take into account the criteria used for identification of LDCs in the allocation of assistance (resolution A/RES/67/221), in order to promote a smooth transition after graduation. The European Commission currently applies this rule. Other multilateral donors are also thinking about better taking into account this resolution in their allocations. An important point stressed in the debate is that the partner countries can be fully part of the evaluation process and inclusion or graduation decisions.

In addition, many countries are also vulnerable to climate change but this criterion is not taken into account in the definition of the LDC category. CDP (Committee for development policy) of the United Nations has proposed the creation of a specific category of countries facing an extreme vulnerability to climate change and other environmental shocks to ensure to these countries a specific assistance. At the risk of multiplying categories and diminishing the relevance of the LDC category. Another solution would be to revise the criteria for the LDC category to better reflect vulnerability to climate change.

Presentations

Roland Mollerus, Chief, Secretariat of the Committee for Development Policy (UN-DESA)

Graduation, differentiation, and vulnerability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Graduation et différenciation au regard de la vulnérabilité et de la fragilité

ONU Evénement organisé par UN-OHRLLS et la Ferdi en parallèle aux 6e rencontres de haut niveau du Development Cooperation Forum (DCF)- ECOSOC.

En collaboration avec le Bureau du Haut Représentant des Nations unies pour les pays les moins avancés, les pays en développement sans littoral et les petits États insulaires en développement (UN-OHRLLS), la Ferdi a organisé un événement parallèle au Development Cooperation Forum 2018 sur le thème de la graduation et la différenciation des pays.

Celui-ci s’est tenu le 21 mai 2018 à New York.

Modéré par Patrick Guillaumont, Président de la Ferdi., il a réuni les panélistes suivants :

Shamshad Akhtar, Secrétaire général adjoint des Nations unies et Secrétaire exécutive de UN-ESCAP

Roland Mollerus, Chef du Secrétariat du Comité pour les politiques de développement  (CDP / UN-DESA)

Robin Ogilvy, Représentant spécial de l’OCDE au Nations unies

Susanna Wolf, Chargé de programme Senior à UN-OHRLLS

Ngueto Tiraina Yambaye, Ancien ministre de l’Economie et du Plan du Tchad et ancien directeur exécutif du groupe Afrique II au Fonds monétaire international

Contexte

L'objectif de cette session parallèle était de discuter de l'importance de la prise en compte des vulnérabilités dans la différenciation des pays, de la définition des catégories de pays et de la manière dont les donateurs soutiennent une transition douce pour les pays gradués. 

Le renforcement de la durabilité et de la résilience par le biais de la coopération au développement implique la prise en compte des différents types de vulnérabilité - économique, sociale et climatique - auxquels sont confrontés les pays en développement.

Pour les pays les moins avancés, la vulnérabilité, qui est un élément clé de la catégorie, n'est pas un critère obligatoire pour la sortie de la catégorie des PMA, mais elle est davantage considérée d'un point de vue qualitatif. L'Assemblée générale des Nations unies a invité les partenaires au développement à tenir compte de la vulnérabilité dans l’allocation de leur aide, afin de promouvoir une transition sans heurt après la sortie de la catégorie PMA. A un niveau de revenu par habitant plus élevé, la vulnérabilité a également été reconnue comme un élément à prendre en compte pour la définition de la liste des pays en développement éligibles à l'APD élaborée par le Comité d'aide au développement de l’OCDE (CAD).

Par ailleurs, concernant la graduation  à des niveaux intermédiaires de revenu, en particulier au regard des instruments financiers de différenciation utilisés par les banques multilatérales de développement, la vulnérabilité n'est pas systématiquement prise en compte, alors que la fragilité de l'État peut impliquer un traitement spécial. 

Cet événement parallèle a réuni des représentants de haut niveau des gouvernements, des institutions internationales et de la société civile pour discuter de la manière dont la vulnérabilité et la fragilité peuvent être prises en compte de manière cohérente.

Voir : Éléments de contexte par Shamshad Akhtar

Compte-rendu

Lors de cet événement parallèle a été soulignée l'importance de prendre en compte les vulnérabilités dans la différenciation des pays, la définition des catégories de pays et la manière dont les donateurs soutiennent une transition douce pour les pays gradués. 

Il existe de nombreuses raisons justifiant la différenciation des partenariats pour le développement, au premier rang desquelles la grande hétérogénéité des pays dont certains se trouvent être dans des situations très spécifiques.

Ce besoin de différenciation implique des règles, automatiques ou discrétionnaires. La simple utilisation du niveau de revenu par habitant s’avère réductrice, c’est pourquoi la prise en compte de critères de vulnérabilité, bien que ce concept soit complexe à définir précisément, semble judicieuse et adaptée pour intégrer la dimension durable du développement.

Lorsque l’application d’une mesure de politique n’est pas binaire, l’utilisation de critères continus plutôt que des catégories discontinues de pays se révèle plus pertinente : cela permet notamment d’éviter les effets de seuils, de différencier les pays au sein d’une catégorie, et d’amortir les sorties de catégories.

L’usage de critères continus évite également l’instabilité dans l’appartenance à une catégorie pour les pays dont les caractéristiques sont proches des seuils d’inclusion et graduation (même si graduation et inclusion peuvent répondre à des règles asymétriques pour éviter ce problème de réversibilité, comme avec les PMA par exemple).

Une implication de ce débat concerne l’allocation de l’aide, et ce à plusieurs égards.

Le débat a notamment abordé le cas des pays à revenu intermédiaire en raison du grand nombre de pauvres qu’ils comptent et d’une éventuelle perte de ressources extérieures lorsqu’ils sortent de la catégorie PMA et/ou pays à faible revenu. C’est néanmoins la responsabilité des pays gradués – qui sont supposés connaître une amélioration de leur économie – de partager avec les plus pauvres de leur population le fruit de cette amélioration. De plus, la catégorie PMA (ou les critères qui la définissent) rassemble des pays généralement affectés par des handicaps structurels significativement plus importants que dans les autres catégories de pays.

Il a également été discuté de l’importance de prendre en compte les causes profondes des conflits qui sont aujourd’hui le principal catalyseur des vulnérabilités et des fragilités, afin d’éviter à termes de devoir consommer une partie importante des ressources concessionnelles en faveur d’une catégorie de pays identifiés comme fragiles. Ce point illustre la pertinence de considérer des variables continues permettant d’identifier des faiblesses à des stades précoces et de les prendre en compte dans les allocations plutôt que des catégories de pays dont les membres ne font partie que lorsque la faiblesse est suffisamment importante pour être prise en compte.

Le cas des PMA illustre particulièrement le sujet de l’évènement parallèle. Le caractère binaire de l’appartenance ou non à la catégorie implique des changements abrupts dans le statut des pays et leur accès à nombre de mesures – tandis que le développement est un processus continu.

Les PMA gradués peuvent ainsi ne plus être éligibles aux mesures de support spécifiques qui leur sont réservées tandis qu’ils font face à de nombreuses vulnérabilités persistantes. Les Nations Unies accompagnent les PMA lorsque ceux-ci se trouvent gradués et encouragent les bailleurs à mettre en place des mécanismes visant à lisser les effets de seuils. C’est dans cet esprit que l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies a invité les partenaires au développement à tenir compte des critères d’identification des PMA dans l’allocation de leur aide (résolution A/RES/67/221), afin de promouvoir une transition sans heurt après la sortie de la catégorie PMA. La Commission européenne applique actuellement cette règle. D’autres bailleurs multilatéraux réfléchissent également à mieux tenir compte de cette résolution dans leurs allocations. Un point important souligné lors du débat est que les pays partenaires puissent être pleinement partie prenante des processus d’évaluation et de décisions d’inclusion ou de graduation.

En outre, de nombreux pays sont également vulnérables au changement climatique, critère non pris en compte dans la définition de la catégorie.  Le CDP (Comité pour les politiques de développement) des Nations Unies propose à ce titre la création d’une catégorie spécifique de pays faisant face à une vulnérabilité extrême au changement climatique et à d’autres chocs environnementaux afin de garantir à ces pays l’allocation d’une aide spécifique. Au risque de multiplier les catégories et d’amoindrir la pertinence de la catégorie des PMA. Une autre solution serait de réviser les critères de la catégorie PMA pour mieux tenir compte de la vulnérabilité au changement climatique.

Présentations

Roland Mollerus, Chef du Secrétariat du Comité pour les politiques de développement  (CDP / UN-DESA)

Graduation, differentiation, and vulnerability

 

 

 

 

Patrick Guillaumont, Président de la Ferdi.

 

 

 

 

UN-OHRLLS : Expert Group Meeting on UN Support for Graduation and Smooth Transition for LDCs

Patrick Guillaumont spoke during the opening session.

On 14th December 2017, the UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries organized the Expert Group Meeting on UN Support for Graduation and Smooth Transition for LDCs.

The meeting allowed to take stock of the assistance provided by the United Nations system to support the LDCs in their efforts to achieve the goals contained in the Istanbul Programme of Action and meeting the criteria for graduation.

Patrick Guillaumont, President of FERDI, spoke during the opening session where he presented a state of the LDCs graduation and  the elements of a slow path of graduation. Among the recommendations made to accelerate graduation, he stressed the need to strengthen connection between LDCs and Sustainable Development Goals and the need to take into account the vulnerability issue in graduation :

 

More information (concept note, programme, speakers) : http://unohrlls.org/

 

UN-OHRLLS : réunion du groupe d’experts sur le soutien à la graduation et à la transition douce des Pays les moins avancés

Patrick Guillaumont est intervenu lors de la session d'ouverture.

Le 14 décembre 2017, le Bureau du Haut Représentant pour les pays les moins avancés des Nations Unies a organisé la réunion du groupe d’expert sur le soutien à la graduation et à la transition douce des Pays les moins avancés.

La réunion a permis de faire le point sur l'aide fournie par le système des Nations Unies pour aider les PMA dans leurs efforts pour atteindre les objectifs énoncés dans le Programme d'action d'Istanbul et satisfaire aux critères de graduation.

Patrick Guillaumont, président de la Ferdi, est intervenu lors de la  session d'ouverture où il a présenté un état des lieux des pays ayant atteint le niveau de graduation et les éléments de ralentissement de la graduation des pays. Parmi les recommandations faites pour accélérer la graduation, il a souligné la nécessité de renforcer les liens entre PMA et Objectifs de développement durable et la nécessaire prise en compte des questions de vulnérabilité dans la graduation :

 

Plus d'information (concept note, programme, interventions) : http://unohrlls.org/

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Panel Discussion on TOSSD: A statistical measurement framework for tracking the Means of Implementation to achieve the SDGs

Panel discussion organised by OECD, the French Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs, and FERDI /ECOSOC Financing for Development Forum
Panel Discussion on Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD): A statistical measurement framework for tracking the Means of Implementation to achieve the SDGs

ECOSOC Financing for Development Forum


Wednesday 24 May 2017 • 18:30-20:00
UN HQ Conference room 7

 

Objectives of the discussion

  • Harnessing synergies at global and country level on strategies to promote effective and integrated frameworks to mobilise all available resources – aid, taxation, domestic and international private finance, remittances and philanthropy – in support of financing for sustainable development.
  • Promoting enhanced accountability and incentives for resources beyond ODA. Advance understanding about the nature and potential future role of the TOSSD measurement framework to strengthen data and monitoring of the Means of Implementation, including in support of global public goods and reducing economic, social/political and environmental vulnerabilities.

 

Speakers

  • Mr. Jorge Moreira da Silva, Director, OECD Development Co-operation Directorate
  • Mr. Philippe Orliange, Director, Agence Francaise de Developpement
  • H.E. Ambassador João Vale de Almeida, European Union
  • H.E. Ambassador Horacio Sevilla Borja, Ecuador
  • H.E. Ambassador Masood Bin Momen, Bangladesh (LDC Group)
  • H.E Ambassador Marie Chatardová, Czech Republic
  • H.E. Ambassador Michel Tommo Monthé, Cameroon
  • Ms. Shari Spiegel, Chief of the Policy Analysis & Development Branch, UN-DESA

Key Discussants :

  • Mr. Francois Legue, Foreign Affairs Counsellor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MAEDI), France
  • Mr. Matthieu Boussichas, Programme Manager, Ferdi

Moderator : Ms. Minh-Thu D. Pham, Executive Director of Policy, United Nations Foundation

 

Questions for discussion

  • Which policies most effectively mobilise all available resources – aid, taxation, domestic and international private finance, remittances and philanthropy – in an integrated manner in support of financing for sustainable development?
  • How could the TOSSD metric best be aligned with developing country information needs for developing their SDG financing strategies? How could a broader measurement framework better track support for global public goods and efforts to reduce economic, social/political and environmental vulnerabilities?
  • How could ECOSOC play an active role in developing TOSSD – to ensure it is as useful as possible for different international actors, monitoring processes and analytical thinking as the international community gears up for tracking broader resources financing the SDGs?

 

Événement organisé par la Ferdi, seule ou en collaboration

Table ronde sur le TOSSD: un cadre de mesure de suivi statistique des moyens mis en œuvre pour atteindre les Objectifs de développement durable (ODD)

Evénement parallèle organisé par l'OCDE, le Ministère de l'Europe et des Affaires étrangères français et la Ferdi lors du Forum ECOSOC sur le financement du développement.
Table ronde sur le "total official support for sustainable development" : un cadre de mesure de suivi statistique des moyens mis en œuvre pour atteindre les Objectifs de développement durable (ODD)

Forum ECOSOC sur le financement du développement


Mercredi 24 mai 2017 • 18:30-20:00
UN HQ Conference room 7

Objectifs

  • Exploiter en faveur des stratégies de développement les synergies aux niveaux national et global afin de promouvoir des cadres efficaces et intégrés capables de mobiliser toutes les ressources disponibles - aide, ressources fiscales, financement privé national et international, transferts des migrants, et philanthropie - en appui au financement du développement durable.
  • Inciter la mobilisation des ressources au-delà de l'APD.  Une compréhension approfondie de la nature et du rôle potentiel futur du cadre de mesure TOSSD afin d’améliorer la disponibilité et la qualité des données et le suivi des moyens de mise en œuvre, y compris en appui aux biens publics mondiaux, et en réduisant les vulnérabilités économiques, sociales, politiques et environnementales.

Intervenants

Mr. Jorge Moreira da Silva, Directeur, Direction de la coopération pour le développement de l'OCDE

Mr. Philippe Orliange, Directeur, Agence Francaise de Developpement

S.E. l'Ambassadeur João Vale de Almeida, Union européenne

S.E. l'Ambassadeur Horacio Sevilla Borja, Aquateur 

S.E. l'Ambassadeur Masood Bin Momen, Bangladesh (Groupe PMA)

S.E. l'Ambassadeur Marie Chatardová, République Tchèque

S.E. l'Ambassadeur Michel Tommo Monthé, Cameroun

Ms. Shari Spiegel, Chef du Service de l'analyse et de l'élaboration des politiques, UN-DESA

Key Discustants :

Mr. Francois Legue, Conseiller, Ministère de l'Europe et des Affaires étrangères, France

Mr. Matthieu Boussichas, Responsable de programme, Ferdi

Modérateur : Ms. Minh-Thu D. Pham, Directeur exécutif des politiques, Fondation des Nations Unies

Questions pour la discussion

  • Quelles politiques mobilisent le plus efficacement toutes les ressources disponibles - l'aide, la fiscalité, les financements privés nationaux et internationaux, les transferts des migrants et la philanthropie - d'une manière intégrée à l'appui du financement du développement durable?
  • Comment la mesure du TOSSD pourrait être alignée sur les besoins d'information des pays en développement pour développer leurs stratégies de financement des ODD? Comment un cadre de mesure plus large pourrait-il mieux suivre le soutien apporté aux biens publics mondiaux et les efforts pour réduire les vulnérabilités économiques, sociales, politiques et environnementales?
  • Comment l'ECOSOC pourrait jouer un rôle actif dans le développement du TOSSD - pour s'assurer qu'il soit le plus utile possible aux différents acteurs internationaux, dans les processus de suivi et la réflexion analytique alors que la communauté internationale se prépare à un suivi plus large des ressources qui financent les ODD?

 

Malaria and Developmental Impacts

Josselin Thuilliez, Research Professor at the CNRS and Fellow at Ferdi was a panelist at this workshop where he has presented a paper on this issue.

Despite decades of control efforts, malaria remains a life-threatening disease with pernicious effects on development. The NYU Africa House and the NYU College of Global Public Health have organised a panel discussion on “Malaria and Developmental Impacts” preceded by a presentation by Dr. Josselin Thuilliez on his paper “Disease and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from the Roll Back Malaria Partnership in Africa,” co-authored with Maria Kuecken and Marie-Anne Valfort. The discussion looked at malaria campaigns, microeconomic data, impacts on household human capital production, infant mortality rates and fertility, labor supply, educational attainment, and large-scale public health efforts to reduce disease in Africa.

Following the presentation, Professor Yesim Tozan moderated a panel discussion with Professors Jane Carlton, Chris Dickey, Yaw Nyarko, Gbenga Ogedegbe, and Josselin Thuilliez. 

Speakers and Panelists

  • Jane Carlton, Professor of Biology; Director, Center for Genomics and Systems Biology
  • Chris Dickey, Clinical Associate Professor of Global Public Health; Director, Global Professional Studies and Entrepreneurship
  • Yaw Nyarko, Professor of Economics; Director, Center for Technology and Economic Development (CTED); Co-Director, Development Research Institute; Director, Africa House
  • Gbenga Ogedegbe, Vice Dean, CGPH; Professor of Population Health, School of Medicine
  • Josselin Thuilliez, Research Professor at CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research); Co-Director, Department of Sustainable Development Economics, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne; and Visiting Fellow at Princeton University
  • Yesim Tozan, Clinical Associate Professor, CGPH (Moderator)

 

The Africa House website : http://www.nyuafricahouse.org

Le paludisme et ses impacts sur le développement

Josselin Thuilliez, Chercheur au CNRS et Fellow à la Ferdi a participé à cette rencontre où il était panéliste et a présenté un papier sur le sujet.

Malgré des décennies de lutte, le paludisme demeure une maladie potentiellement mortelle avec des effets pernicieux sur le développement. La maison de l'Afrique (Africa House) de l'Université de New-York et le Collège de la santé publique mondiale de l'Université de New-York ont organisé un atelier d'échanges sur le thème du paludisme et ses impacts sur le développement. Cette discussion était précédée d'une présentation par le professeur Josselin Thuilliez de son papier “Disease and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from the Roll Back Malaria Partnership in Africa,” qu'il a co-écrit avec  Maria Kuecken and Marie-Anne Valfort.

La discussion a porté sur les campagnes d'information contre le paludisme, sur les données microéconomiques, sur l'impact du paludisme sur les taux de mortalité infantile et la fécondité, sur l'offre de main d'oeuvre, sur les résultats scolaires, et sur les efforts en matière de santé publique pour réduire la maladie en Afrique.

Après la présentation du professeur Josselin Thuiliez, le professeur Yesim Tozan a modéré la discussion avec les professeurs Jane Carlton, Chris Dickey, Yaw Nyarko, Gbenga Ogedegbe, et Josselin Thuilliez. 

Intervenants

  • Jane Carlton, Professor of Biology; Director, Center for Genomics and Systems Biology
  • Chris Dickey, Clinical Associate Professor of Global Public Health; Director, Global Professional Studies and Entrepreneurship
  • Yaw Nyarko, Professor of Economics; Director, Center for Technology and Economic Development (CTED); Co-Director, Development Research Institute; Director, Africa House
  • Gbenga Ogedegbe, Vice Dean, CGPH; Professor of Population Health, School of Medicine
  • Josselin Thuilliez, Research Professor at CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research); Co-Director, Department of Sustainable Development Economics, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne; and Visiting Fellow at Princeton University
  • Yesim Tozan, Clinical Associate Professor, CGPH (Moderator)

 

Site internet de la Maison de l'Afrique : http://www.nyuafricahouse.org

High-Level Meeting on ending aids

United Nations General Assembly. Patrick Guillaumont introduced the side-event on financing vulnerabilities.

The 2016 High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS will focus the world’s attention on the importance of a Fast-Track approach to the AIDS response over the next five years. The UNAIDS Fast-Track approach aims to achieve ambitious targets by 2020, including:

  • Fewer than 500 000 people newly infected with HIV.
  • Fewer than 500 000 people dying from AIDS-related causes.
  • Elimination of HIV-related discrimination.

Patrick Guillaumont, President of the Ferdi, is taking part in the side-event Financing Vulnerability .

Side-event : Financing vulnerabilities

Tuesday, 7 June

18:00–19:30

Venue: UN Conference Room 3

Rising inequalities and the lack of access to livelihood and development opportunities as well as social and health services for the most marginalized and poor people are urgent issues. These are particularly acute in the global context of rapid and uneven economic growth, inequitable development and rising standards of living for a few in developing countries. Addressing such inequalities is at the heart of the Sustainable Development Goals adopted by the United Nations Member States in September 2015.

The AIDS response has achieved much success in ensuring access to treatment and reductions in new HIV infections globally, especially for the most vulnerable and marginalized people. Yet much work remains to be done; millions of people are being left behind. The challenges posed by the AIDS epidemic today highlight the need to place people who are being left behind at the centre of development efforts. There is an immediate need for increased and front-loaded financing to tackle the HIV epidemic. Today, millions of people are not able to access services, resulting in unnecessary death and disability; 19 million people do not know their HIV status. A treatment crisis is looming. Increased and efficient investments are a critical part of the solution.

In this context, the side event on financing vulnerabilities will explore mechanisms to ensure that fragile communities are at the centre of the global public health agenda, and their health secured, at a time when new epidemics and health threats threaten to further increase the vulnerability of low- and middle-income countries and their people. The side event will explore social and economic risks of the people who are most vulnerable and will call for new commitments and innovations to meet their needs.

MODERATOR
Luiz Loures, ASG, Deputy Executive Director, UNAIDS (Brazil)
 
CHAIR OPENING REMARKS
Olusegun Obasanjo, Former President, UNAIDS Champion for an AIDS Free Generation (Nigeria)
 

SETTING THE SCENE

Patrick Guillaumont, President of the Fondation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International (France)

 

 

 

PANEL

Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme (New Zealand)

Antonio Patriota,  Ambassador of Brazil to the United Nations, New York (Brazil)

Dorcas Makgato, Minister of Health (Botswana)

Javier Bellocq, International HIV/AIDS Alliance (Argentina)

Philippe Meunier, Global AIDS Ambassador (France)

Focal point: Anne-Claire Guichard, guicharda@unaids.org

Download brochure | Webcast